Tardis-noise inventor dies

Daphne Oram, one of the pioneers of electronic music, has died. (BBC)

Almost un-noticed by the wider world, one of the pioneers of electronic music has died. Without Daphne Oram, we may never had known what the Tardis sounded like. Electronic music – as much a part of today’s life as whistling a tune to yourself – grew up amid milk bottles, gravel, keys, and yards of magnetic tape and wires. These were the sort of tools typically scattered around the BBC’s Radiophonic Workshop in the 1950s and 60s, when they were used to generate wonderful and ethereal sounds for the airwaves. The mother of this great legacy was Daphne Oram. Aged 18, and armed with a passionate interest in sound, music and electronics, she started work at the BBC in 1943 as a sound engineer.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Both comments and trackbacks are currently closed.

One Comment

  1. CraigF
    Posted November 5, 2006 at 17:09 | Permalink

    I think you’ll find it was Brian Hodgson who created the Tardis sound effect.

    The theme music was engineered by Delia Derbyshire.