Don’t worry about

Irish techies — wondering what the next website to put the fear into your parents will be? Here it is: It’s been getting a bit of coverage from the Irish technology press recently, it seems, as the new site from IE Internet.

(IE Internet are the Irish internet company that puts a press release every month or so telling us how much of their mail is being filtered as spam, which Silicon Republic et al dutifully report as news, month after month.)

I got a call from my mother last week, telling me that she’d been “blacklisted”, and asking how to fix it. Sure enough, when I found out that she’d heard this on, I went to the site, and her IP address was indeed listed — as was mine:

The IP address is blacklisted.

RBLs checked:

Spam Haus not listed

Spam Cop not listed

Mailwall RBL not listed

Abuse At not listed

SORBS not listed

NJABL listed: Dynamic/Residential IP range listed by NJABL dynablock –

510 SG not listed

Naturally, that IP is listed — it’s entirely ok for a home-user broadband machine to appear in SORBS or NJABL as a dynablock-listed IP. (Dynablock, for those who don’t know, is a set of records for addresses which are known to be residential/end-user “dynamic” addresses, rather than mail relays — so obviously most end-user desktop machines would fall under this category.)

Unfortunately, this distinction isn’t mentioned anywhere on the page… just a large, red, “The IP address is blacklisted” warning.

Worried readers might then reasonably go on to read the site’s Frequently Asked Questions list — which, incredibly, includes a helpful suggestion that you sign up with IE Internet to avoid being listed in future! I’d be curious how that’s supposed to help a home user get off the NJABL dynablock list… a little fishy, if you ask me!

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One Comment

  1. Posted April 24, 2007 at 01:04 | Permalink

    In common with so many DNSBL users they obviously don’t understand how DNSBLs work …

    Of course I’d be ever so slightly biased, as we aren’t afraid to actually provide tangible figures whenever we talk about filtering stats