Links for 2015-09-14

  • Kate Heddleston: How Our Engineering Environments Are Killing Diversity

    ‘[There are] several problem areas for [diversity in] engineering environments and ways to start fixing them. The problems we face aren’t devoid of solutions; there are a lot of things that companies, teams, and individuals can do to fix problems in their work environment. For the month of March, I will be posting detailed articles about the problem areas I will cover in my talk: argument cultures, feedback, promotions, employee on-boarding, benefits, safety, engineering process, and environment adaptation.’ via Baron Schwartz.

    (tags: via:xaprb culture tech diversity sexism feminism engineering work workplaces feedback)

  • Michael Kagan | Prints

    ‘Heavily tinted blue paintings form space stations, spacesuits, and rockets just after blast. Michael Kagan paints these large-scale works to celebrate the man-made object—machinery that both protects and holds the possibility of instantly killing those that operate the equipment from the inside. To paint the large works, Kagan utilizes an impasto technique with thick strokes that are deliberate and unique, showing an aggression in his application of oil paint on linen. The New York-based artist focuses on iconic images in his practice, switching back and forth between abstract and representational styles. “The painting is finished when it can fall apart and come back together depending on how it is read and the closeness to the work,” said Kagan about his work. “Each painting is an image, a snapshot, a flash moment, a quick read that is locked into memory by the iconic silhouettes.”’ Via http://www.thisiscolossal.com/2015/08/michael-kagens-space-paintings/

    (tags: paintings prints art michael-kagan space abstract-art tobuy)

  • Dark corners of Unicode

    I’m assuming, if you are on the Internet and reading kind of a nerdy blog, that you know what Unicode is. At the very least, you have a very general understanding of it — maybe “it’s what gives us emoji”. That’s about as far as most people’s understanding extends, in my experience, even among programmers. And that’s a tragedy, because Unicode has a lot of… ah, depth to it. Not to say that Unicode is a terrible disaster — more that human language is a terrible disaster, and anything with the lofty goals of representing all of it is going to have some wrinkles. So here is a collection of curiosities I’ve encountered in dealing with Unicode that you generally only find out about through experience. Enjoy.

    (tags: unicode characters encoding emoji utf-8 utf-16 utf mysql text)

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