Links for 2017-09-29

  • The Israeli Digital Rights Movement’s campaign for privacy | Internet Policy Review

    This study explores the persuasion techniques used by the Israeli Digital Rights Movement in its campaign against Israel’s biometric database. The research was based on analysing the movement’s official publications and announcements and the journalistic discourse that surrounded their campaign within the political, judicial, and public arenas in 2009-2017. The results demonstrate how the organisation navigated three persuasion frames to achieve its goals: the unnecessity of a biometric database in democracy; the database’s ineffectiveness; and governmental incompetence in securing it. I conclude by discussing how analysing civil society privacy campaigns can shed light over different regimes of privacy governance. [….] 1. Why the database should be abolished: because it’s not necessary – As the organisation highlighted repeatedly throughout the campaign with the backing of cyber experts, there is a significant difference between issuing smart documents and creating a database. Issuing smart documents effectively solves the problem of stealing and forging official documents, but does it necessarily entail the creation of a database? The activists’ answer is no: they declared that while they do support the transition to smart documents (passports and ID cards) for Israeli citizens, they object to the creation of a database due to its violation of citizens’ privacy. 2. Why the database should be abolished: because it’s ineffective; […] 3. Why the database should be abolished: because it will be breached – The final argument was that the database should be abolished because the government would not be able to guarantee protection against security breaches, and hence possible identity theft.

    (tags: digital-rights privacy databases id-cards israel psc drm identity-theft security)

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