Links for 2018-11-08

  • Sci-Fi Writer Greg Egan and 4chan anon Math Whiz Advance Permutation Problem | Quanta Magazine

    On September 16, 2011, an anime fan posted a math question to the online bulletin board 4chan about the cult classic television series ‘The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya’. Season one of the show, which involves time travel, had originally aired in non-chronological order, and a re-broadcast and a DVD version had each further rearranged the episodes. Fans were arguing online about the best order to watch the episodes, and the 4chan poster wondered: If viewers wanted to see the series in every possible order, what is the shortest list of episodes they’d have to watch? In less than an hour, an anonymous person offered an answer — not a complete solution, but a lower bound on the number of episodes required. The argument, which covered series with any number of episodes, showed that for the 14-episode first season of Haruhi, viewers would have to watch at least 93,884,313,611 episodes to see all possible orderings. “Please look over [the proof] for any loopholes I might have missed,” the anonymous poster wrote. The proof slipped under the radar of the mathematics community for seven years — apparently only one professional mathematician spotted it at the time, and he didn’t check it carefully. But in a plot twist last month, the Australian science fiction novelist Greg Egan proved a new upper bound on the number of episodes required. Egan’s discovery renewed interest in the problem and drew attention to the lower bound posted anonymously in 2011. Both proofs are now being hailed as significant advances on a puzzle mathematicians have been studying for at least 25 years.

    (tags: mathematics internet math greg-egan anime bizarre 4chan superpermutation permutation proofs)

  • How do you populate your development databases?

    Lots of comments pro/anti copying from production

    (tags: database data testing system-tests dev)

  • Welcome To The Dystopia: People Are Arguing Whether This Trump Press Conference Video Is Doctored Or Not

    To sum it up: A historically unreliable narrator who works for a conspiracy website tweets out a video in order to show alleged bad behavior on the part of a journalist. The clip goes viral. The White House picks up and disseminates that video and uses it as proof to ban the journalist from reporting at the White House. Outraged journalists decry the White House’s use of a video taken from a historically unreliable narrator. Then, users attempt to debunk the video as “actual fake news.” Others, unclear if the video is fake, urge caution, suggesting the media may be jumping the gun. An argument breaks out over the intricate technical details of doctoring a clip. The entire ordeal is a near perfect example of a scenario disinformation experts have predicted and warned of, where the very threat of video manipulation can lead to a blurring of reality. “These technological underpinnings [of AI and photoshop, and editing programs lead] to the increasing erosion of trust,” computational propaganda researcher Renee DiResta told BuzzFeed News in early 2018. “It makes it possible to cast aspersions on whether videos — or advocacy for that matter — are real.”

    (tags: twitter disinfo disinformation buzzfeed video reality fake-news photoshop)

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2 Comments

  1. Nix
    Posted November 9, 2018 at 20:09 | Permalink

    Uh… why did you tag an article about Greg Egan with ‘greg-bear’? :)

    (This is not the first new thing Greg has proved, either.)

  2. Posted November 10, 2018 at 11:37 | Permalink

    lol! Thanks for spotting that :)

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